Steve jobs apple options backdating

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SAN FRANCISCO (Market Watch) -- Steve Jobs has managed to revolutionize both the consumer electronics and entertainment industries, but the onetime wunderkind can't seem to shake the stigma of the stock-options backdating scandal that enveloped Silicon Valley in recent years.This week, another former confidante to Jobs came under the microscope of federal regulators.Still, given that (a) backdating helps make earnings look better than they are; and (b) Jobs is a huge shareholder of Apple (10.12 million shares, as of last April), how could he not benefit from this behavior? Jobs recommended some backdating dates for other employees.It turns out that Jobs did, indeed, receive backdated options—just not at his own direction. 18, 2001, when the stock stood at .01, the company gave Jobs a monster 7.5-million-share options grant dated Oct. By doing so, the company gave Jobs million in compensation for which it did not account properly. It also pretended the options grant was approved at a special board meeting, when no such meeting occurred. He received a massive grant that was approved at a phantom board meeting, though he didn't know about the phony meeting.Anderson settled his case, but Heinen is still on the hook and expects to go to trial sometime next year.Mather, Anderson and Heinen, through their lawyers, have strenuously denied wrongdoing.

But the options scandal has never touched a more exciting company than Apple or a more thrilling executive than Jobs. In June 2006, a special committee of Apple outside directors, chaired by former Vice President Al Gore, hired its own attorneys to investigate options backdating at the company. It turns out there were literally thousands of examples of backdating at Apple—6,428 options grants on 42 dates over a period of several years.

Ann Mather, who worked as chief financial officer of Pixar Animation Studios before then-chief executive Jobs dealt Pixar to Walt Disney Co.

The move came almost exactly a year after the SEC filed similar charges against former Apple CFO Fred Anderson and former general counsel Nancy Heinen.

has managed to get its mitts on the Apple CEO's deposition with the US Securities and Exchange Commission conducted in the wake of Apple's backdating scandal.

Jobs has always maintained he was unaware of the accounting fraud involved with improper backdating of his options, and no government legal action was taken against the CEO and Apple.

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