Sentences with the word accommodating

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I asked my boss for some time off to help my sick mother, and he was very accommodating. The 0 fee includes your flight, hotel accommodation and entry to a number of tourist attractions.

The government is building temporary accommodation for people who lost their homes in the earthquake.

The agreement of words is their similarity in person, number, gender, case, mood, tense, or form. "The more the works of Cowper are read, the more his readers will find reason to admire the variety and the extent, the graces and the energy, of his literary talents."--HAYLEY: Mur. The leading principles to be observed in the construction of sentences, are embraced in the following twenty-four rules, which are arranged, as nearly as possible, in the order of the parts of speech. For one word may relate to an other and not agree with it; but there is never any necessary agreement between words that have not a relation one to the other, or a connexion according to the sense. What verbs take the infinitive after them without the preposition to? What is the regular construction of participles, as such?

The government of words is that power which one word has over an other, to cause it to assume some particular modification. (Note: Colocation describes words that are normally used together, eg make plans, raise objections, heavy rain. Any similarity happening between unconnected words, is no syntactical concord, though it may rank the terms in the same class etymologically. 3.--From these observations it may be seen, that the most important and most comprehensive principle of English syntax, is the simple Relation of words, according to the sense. "Position means the place which a word occupies in a sentence."--Ib. This last-named author, in touching the text of my books, has often corrupted it, as he does here; but my definitions of the tenses he copied without marring them much.

Here, again, the words would have a meaning which they do not bear in Sacred Scripture. The relation of words is their reference to other words, or their dependence according to the sense. A compound sentence is a sentence which consists of two or more simple ones either expressly or tacitly connected; as, "Send men to Joppa, and call for Simon, whose surname is Peter; who shall tell thee words, whereby thou and all thy house shall be saved."--Acts, xi, 13. A clause, or member, is a subdivision of a compound sentence; and is itself a sentence, either simple or compound: as, "If thine enemy be hungry, give him bread to eat; if he be thirsty, give him water to drink."--Prov., xxv, 21.[324] A phrase is two or more words which express some relation of different ideas, but no entire proposition; as, "By the means appointed."--"To be plain with you."--"Having loved his own." Words that are omitted by ellipsis, and that are necessarily understood in order to complete the construction, (and only such,) must be supplied in parsing. Seven of the ten parts of speech are, with a few exceptions, incapable of any agreement; of these the relation and use must be explained in parsing; and all requisite agreement between any of the rest, is confined to words that relate to each other. Syntax treats of the relation, agreement, government, and arrangement, of words in sentences. The latter is moreover naturally allied to the former. The four things are essentially different in their nature, as may be seen by the definitions given above, yet not so distinct in practice that they can well be made the basis of any perfect division of the rules of syntax. A Pronoun must agree with its antecedent, or the noun or pronoun which it represents, in person, number, and gender. When the antecedent is a collective noun conveying the idea of plurality, the Pronoun must agree with it in the plural number. When a Pronoun has two or more antecedents connected by and, it must agree with them jointly in the plural, because they are taken together. When a Pronoun has two or more antecedents connected by or or nor, it must agree with them singly, and not as if taken together. Every finite Verb must agree with its subject, or nominative, in person and number. When the nominative is a collective noun conveying the idea of plurality, the Verb must agree with it in the plural number. When a Verb has two or more nominatives connected by and, it must agree with them jointly in the plural, because they are taken together. When a Verb has two or more nominatives connected by or or nor, it must agree with them singly, and not as if taken together. The Infinitive Mood is governed in general by the preposition TO, which commonly connects it to a finite verb. The active verbs, bid, dare, feel, hear, let, make, need, see, and their participles, usually take the Infinitive after them without the preposition TO. Participles relate to nouns or pronouns, or else are governed by prepositions. Adverbs relate to verbs, participles, adjectives, or other adverbs. Conjunctions connect words, sentences, or parts of sentences. Prepositions show the relations of words, and of the things or thoughts expressed by them. Interjections have no dependent construction; they are put absolute, either alone, or with other words. But many grammarians, representing this branch of their subject as consisting of two parts only, "concord and government" say little or nothing of the relation and arrangement of words, except as these are involved in the others.

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